Video Instruction – Handling

Special thanks to NISOA Hall of Famer, Brian Hall and Esse Baharmast for their continued support of our instructional program.

Instructions

We strongly suggest you have a copy of the NISOA considerations available as you are reviewing this clip. The NISOA Official decision will reference the considerations and help you better understand the decision making process.
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7 Responses to “Video Instruction – Handling”

  1. Javier Garcia says:

    This is good – show more of these. Referees often call the foul to appease the crowd which largely ignorant to the definition of intentional handling. Also, STOP calling it handball. There is no reference anywhere in the rule to such a term. We are working at the highest levels and professional NISOA referees. Lets, collectively use the correct terminology.

    • Ed Marco says:

      Javier, being professional means that we are also good communicators. Understanding how to communicate something, for example, to a coach is an important part of the experience of each game and acting professionally. Using generally accepted terms such as handball instead of the technically correct handling is an effective way to communicate making sure each person involved understands what is going on and that the explanation of a certain action is communicated. It is always nice to be technical but even better to be thorough.

      • Norm Haythorn says:

        Ed, I think Javier make a very good point, when we speak to anyone about our decisions we need to use the proper terminology. That’s what the Rules / Laws of the Game tell us to do, handling, not hand ball, plus the other terms that they get wrong, offside, not offsides, penalty area, goal area, not the box, goal line, touchline, not end line, not sideline. Coach’s, trainers, players, can call them anything they want to, we are the one’s to say it right. You are right about having communication with the coach’s they are part of the game, but if we use the proper terminology as a group, eventually they may get it right too.

        • John Puglisi says:

          The current Laws of the Game use the term “handball” no less than 3 times. The NCAA Soccer Rules do still use the term “handling the ball” but the point here is that as an instructor, using commonly understood language is very important.

        • Lance VanHaitsma Lance VanHaitsma says:

          Let’s not lose sight on the education provided by this segment of the video instruction series.

          While terminology is important, there are words/phrases that are now universally accepted in the sport.

          We are seeing a trend of more collegiate players coming from international countries.

          With that said, we must be able to communicate effectively using all the resources available.

  2. Tom Smith says:

    Keep up the good work with videos like this. First they are very clear and camera zoom moves in so that you actually see what is going on. Looking at it first time and the whistle I cringed and said please don’t tell me that was for handling. Referees see ball hit hand in the Penalty area and go to the whistle instead of running the considerations through their head then making a decision. Point blank shot.that hits defender, player running, arms in position you would expect if you were on wide open run and had tried to stop. Additionally this is a situation that a college referee will see in his or her game and this video hopefully will be remembered and will not penalize the game. Thank you Brian and Esse.

  3. Bob Kersch says:

    Video is an excellent teaching tool!
    Keep ‘em coming.

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